Do statins cause muscle aches and pain ?

Yes, Statins can cause muscle aches and pains.

But the number of people getting it is very small and in vast majority of people, the symptoms are not serious.

Most importantly, the benefits of statins outweighs the risk of side effects.

That is the conclusion of a study published in BMJ medical journal.

References

BMJ. Associations between statins and adverse events in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: systematic review with pairwise, network, and dose-response meta-analyses
BMJ 2021; 374 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.n1537 (Published 15 July 2021)
Cite this as: BMJ 2021;374:n1537

Disclaimer: Please note- This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is NOT a expert medical opinion on various topics. This blog is purely for information only and do check the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you. The views expressed in this blog represent the author’s personal views held at the time of drafting the blog and may change overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light. The blog is NOT previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any organisation that the author is associated with. The views expressed in this blog are NOT, in way whatsoever, intended to be a substitute for professional advice.

What time of the day should you take your blood pressure medication: morning or evening?

It is a common question for many people. When should the blood pressure medications be taken?

High blood is quite common in the General population. High blood pressure can cause blood vessel damage, heart problems and brain damage.

First of all , Taking medication regularly, at any time of the day, is more important than forgetting to take the medication every day.

If one does take the blood pressure medication regularly, then taking it at evening seems to be more beneficial than taking the medication in the morning.

A Japanese study assessed blood pressure of patients continuously at home. All patients in the study underwent 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring at baseline. Patients were then followed every year to determine the rate of heart and blood vessel complications .

The Japanese study found that high nightime blood pressure readings were an important sign of future heart problems.

A review by the renowned Cochrane group found that “better blood pressure control was achieved with bedtime dosing than morning administration of blood pressure (antihypertensive) medication”

So if possible taking the blood pressure medication at bedtime makes sense .

References:

(1) Nighttime Blood Pressure Phenotype and Cardiovascular Prognosis. Practitioner-Based Nationwide JAMP Study. Kazuomi Kario, et al. On behalf of the JAMP Study Group.
Originally published2 Nov 2020. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.120.049730Circulation. 2020;142:1810–1820

(2). Zhao P, Xu P, Wan C, Wang Z. Evening versus morning dosing regimen drug therapy for hypertension. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD004184. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004184.pub2

Disclaimer: Please note- This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is purely for information only and do check the the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you.

The views expressed in this blog represent the author’s views held at the time of drafting the blog and may change overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light. The blog is not necessarily endorsed by any organisation the author is associated with and views are not substitute for professional advice.

New drug treatments for COVID-19

More good news in fight against COVID-19 pandemic !

Steroids were previously proven to be effective against severe Coronavirus (COVID-19) infection. The steroids are believed to work by dampening the inflammation caused by coronavirus.

Dexamethasone and Prednisolone are the commonly used steroids.

Now two other drugs have been reported to work in COVID-19 infection. (yet to be published).

Both the anti-inflammatory drugs are not entirely new drugs as they are already routinely used for treatment of various arthritis.

The BBC reports: “The anti-inflammatory medications, given via a drip, save an extra life for every 12 treated, say researchers who have carried out a trial in NHS intensive care units”.

The two drugs “tocilizumab and sarilumab” may become available for treatment of severe COVID-19 shortly.

All these additional drug treatments are needed ONLY for severe Coronavirus (COVID-19) infection. Mild COVID-19 infections do NOT need these drug treatments.

References . BBC news. Two more life-saving Covid drugs discovered. By Michelle Roberts. Health editor, BBC News online. Published 7 Jan 2021.

BBC news. Coronavirus: Dexamethasone proves first life-saving drug. By Michelle Roberts. Health editor, BBC News online. Published 16 June 2020

BBC News. Tocilizumab: Arthritis drug may treat severe Covid. By James Gallagher. Health and science correspondent. Published 19 November 2020

BMJ. Dexamethasone in management of covid -19. BMJ 2020; 370 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m2648 (Published 03 July 2020)
Cite this as: BMJ 2020;370:m2648

BMJ. Rapid Recommendations. A living WHO guideline on drugs for covid-19. BMJ 2020; 370 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m3379 (Published 04 September 2020). Cite this as: BMJ 2020;370:m3379

BMJ. Covid-19: Arthritis drugs improve survival in intensive care patients, shows study
BMJ 2021; 372 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.n61 (Published 08 January 2021)
Cite this as: BMJ 2021;372:n61

eMC. Sarilumab is a human monoclonal antibody selective for the interleukin-6 (IL-6) receptor, produced in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells by recombinant DNA technology. (Sarilumab, administered as a subcutaneous injection is routinely used for treatment of arthritis and is not an entirely new drug).

eMC. Tocilizumab is a recombinant humanized, anti-human monoclonal antibody of the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) sub-class directed against soluble and membrane-bound interleukin 6 receptors. (Tocilizumab, as a intravenous or subcutaneous formulation, is routinely used for treatment of various arthritis and is also not an entirely new drug).

Disclaimer: Please note- This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is purely for information only and do check the the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you.

The views expressed in this blog represent the author’s views held at the time of drafting the blog and may change overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light. The blog is not necessarily endorsed by any organisation the author is associated with and the authors views are not in way intended to be a substitute for professional advice.