What’s in a name?

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The word cancer is a dreaded one. Not without a good reason. Cancer is the number one killer. Even when someone has a good outcome, the cancer journey is torture. Emotional turmoil is immeasurably horrendous.

But many people would be surprised to hear that there exists a category of low risk cancers. “Low-risk Cancers are cancers which usually don’t kill; These Cancers are found either incidentally on scans performed for some other reasons or found as part of routine cancer screening.”

Because they are not deadly, Should the patients diagnosed with low-risk cancers be spared the dreaded label of cancer?

Should low-risk cancers be labelled something else and the word cancer used only for the “serious” high-risk cancers ?

Personally, I do not agree with renaming of the low risk cancers..Others disagree

Joint the debate at the BMJ.

Submit your views through rapid response

Reference: 
Should we rename low risk cancers? BMJ

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New test for Prostate cancer

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Research team from Dundee University are developing  a new scan for diagnosis of prostate cancer.  The technique is non-invasive. This novel scan uses an ultrasound process called shear wave elastography (SWE) to detect prostate tumours.

The team’s leader, Professor Ghulam Nabi claims “Our new method is far more accurate and also allows us to identify the difference between cancerous and benign tissue in the prostate without the need for invasive surgery.”

This exciting project was funded by Prostate Cancer UK with support from the Movember Foundation.

The raw data from the paper abstract does call for caution. The test was done in patients who are already known to have prostate cancer. The test was not use to diagnose the cancer. It was a single centre study which usually calls for caution. How well the scan would perform in ” real world” patients who are yet to be diagnosed with prostate cancer remains to be seen.

Early results from about 200 patients are very promising indeed. The test has enormous potential if it is proven to work in a large scale, multi-centre trial.

Links:

  1. The Guardian: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/apr/22/prostate-cancer-ultrasound-diagnosis-test.
  2. Daily Mail: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-5643999/Dundee-scientists-new-non-invasive-ultrasound-detect-prostate-cancer.html.
  3. BBC: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-tayside-central-43864875.
  4. Pubmed: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29605444

 

Image credit: Anon