What time of the day should you take your blood pressure medication: morning or evening?

It is a common question for many people. When should the blood pressure medications be taken?

High blood is quite common in the General population. High blood pressure can cause blood vessel damage, heart problems and brain damage.

First of all , Taking medication regularly, at any time of the day, is more important than forgetting to take the medication every day.

If one does take the blood pressure medication regularly, then taking it at evening seems to be more beneficial than taking the medication in the morning.

A Japanese study assessed blood pressure of patients continuously at home. All patients in the study underwent 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring at baseline. Patients were then followed every year to determine the rate of heart and blood vessel complications .

The Japanese study found that high nightime blood pressure readings were an important sign of future heart problems.

A review by the renowned Cochrane group found that “better blood pressure control was achieved with bedtime dosing than morning administration of blood pressure (antihypertensive) medication”

So if possible taking the blood pressure medication at bedtime makes sense .

References:

(1) Nighttime Blood Pressure Phenotype and Cardiovascular Prognosis. Practitioner-Based Nationwide JAMP Study. Kazuomi Kario, et al. On behalf of the JAMP Study Group.
Originally published2 Nov 2020. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.120.049730Circulation. 2020;142:1810–1820

(2). Zhao P, Xu P, Wan C, Wang Z. Evening versus morning dosing regimen drug therapy for hypertension. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD004184. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004184.pub2

Disclaimer: Please note- This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is purely for information only and do check the the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you.

The views expressed in this blog represent the author’s views held at the time of drafting the blog and may change overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light. The blog is not necessarily endorsed by any organisation the author is associated with and views are not substitute for professional advice.

Health problems in middle age

A recent British study reports that nearly a third of middle-aged adults have at least two Health issues.

This is very a depressing statistic.

Lot of people seem to suffering from high blood pressure, mental ill-health and back problems.

It’s important that people take time to look after themselves even if work and life in general is stressful.

It is also important to note that COVID affects people with underlying health issues much more badly.

On the other hand, middle aged people who have health issues should not despair. They are not an exception and think of themselves as very unlucky.

They can see that lots of other people are also suffering. They should get on with their lives and make it better.

This may sound a bit odd at first glance. But some people do find it reassuring to know that lots of other people are also suffering with same health issues.

For example, Some of prostate cancers patients are relieved when they learn that hundreds of thousands of people are out there, living for many years, after a cancer diagnosis. They are not alone.

Cancer Research U.K. website says this: “An estimated 280,500 men who had been diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1991 and 2010 were alive in the UK at the end of 2010”

References

BBC news. Chronic health issues for third in late 40s – study

BMJ. Features of 20 133 UK patients in hospital with covid-19 using the ISARIC WHO Clinical Characterisation Protocol: prospective observational cohort study
BMJ 2020; 369 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m1985 (Published 22 May 2020)
Cite this as: BMJ 2020;369:m1985

Cancer Research U.K. Prostate cancer incidence statistics ( prevalence)

Macmillan Cancer Support and National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service. Cancer Prevalence UK Data Tables(link is external). London: NCRAS; 2015.

Prostate Cancer U.K.: Support Groups.

Disclaimer: Please note- This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is NOT a expert medical opinion on various topics. This blog is purely for information only and do check the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you. The views expressed in this blog represent the author’s personal views held at the time of drafting the blog and may change overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light. The blog is NOT previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any organisation that the author is associated with. The views expressed in this blog are NOT, in way whatsoever, intended to be a substitute for professional advice.

Are breakfast cereals bad for your heart?

Yes.

A large study in BMJ reports that high intake of cereals is associated with higher risk of Blood pressure and Heart diseases.

High intake of white bread, pasta/noodles were also as bad as breakfast cereals because of the refined grains.

Intake of whole grains and whole grain porridges. did not affect the health outcomes.

Interestingly, white rice did not affect the health outcomes either.

Associations of cereal grains intake with cardiovascular disease and mortality across 21 countries in Prospective Urban and Rural Epidemiology study: prospective cohort study
BMJ 2021; 372 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m4948 (Published 03 February 2021)
Cite this as: BMJ 2021;372:m4948

Disclaimer: Please note- This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is NOT a expert medical opinion on various topics. This blog is purely for information only and do check the the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you.

The views expressed in this blog represent the author’s views held at the time of drafting the blog and may change overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light. The blog is not previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any organisation the author is associated with. The authors views are not in way intended to be a substitute for professional advice.