Traffic noise and dementia

Can the noisy traffic outside your home increase your risk of getting dementia ?

Possibly yes.

A study from Denmark looked at “exposure to road traffic and railway noise” and “risk of dementia” in later life.

They found “traffic noise” is associated with risk of dementia.

A word of caution though!

This study does NOT conclusively prove that noise caused dementia. In science, association does not prove causation.

It is known that some people with hearing loss are more likely to develop dementia in later life.

It is possible that people with hearing loss were NOT bothered with traffic noise and carried on living in places with traffic noise.

On the other hand, people with good hearing were bothered by traffic noise and moved away from areas with traffic noise to live in a quieter area with less traffic noise.

This natural human behaviour could have affected the results of this study from Denmark

So, it may appear, at first glance, that traffic noise caused dementia. But deeper examination shows that the results of Denmark study are not conclusive and more confirmatory studies are needed.

References

Residential exposure to transportation noise in Denmark and incidence of dementia: national cohort study
BMJ 2021; 374 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.n1954 (Published 09 September 2021)Cite this as: BMJ 2021;374:n1954

Dementia.org: The Connection Between Hearing Loss And Dementia

NHS blog. Keeping your ear to the ground on dementia

Hearing loss and the connection to Alzheimer’s disease, dementia
By American Heart Association News.

Disclaimer: Please note – This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is NOT a expert medical opinion on various topics. This blog is purely for information only and do check the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you. The views expressed in this blog are NOT, in way whatsoever, intended to be a substitute for professional advice. The blog is NOT previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed, in any way, by any organisation that the author is associated with. The views expressed in this blog likely represents some of the author’s personal views held at the time of drafting the blog and MAY CHANGE overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light.

Are mind numbing jobs associated with dementia ?

Yes.

It’s the principle of “use it or lose it”.

Body muscle strength can be lost quickly if it is not used. That’s why many people try to go to Gym and exercise regularly.

The same principle seems to apply to the brain.

People who are using their brain regularly with stimulating jobs are better off than people who are doing mind numbing jobs when it comes to dementia later in life.

So if your are not using your brain that much in your job, perhaps you need a “brain Gym” outside your work !

References

BMJ Research: Cognitive stimulation in the workplace, plasma proteins, and risk of dementia: three analyses of population cohort studies
BMJ 2021; 374 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.n1804 (Published 19 August 2021)
Cite this as: BMJ 2021;374:n1804. https://www.bmj.com/content/374/bmj.n1804

BBC. Dull jobs really do numb the mind

Daily Mail. A boring job really CAN make you brain dead: Lack of stimulation ‘affects memory and concentration later in life’

Disclaimer: Please note – This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is NOT a expert medical opinion on various topics. This blog is purely for information only and do check the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you. The views expressed in this blog are NOT, in way whatsoever, intended to be a substitute for professional advice. The blog is NOT previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed, in any way, by any organisation that the author is associated with. The views expressed in this blog likely represents some of the author’s personal views held at the time of drafting the blog and MAY CHANGE overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light.

Coffee and dementia: Good or bad ?

Bad !

According to a recent large study which analysed ‘habitual coffee consumption in 398,646 UK Biobank participants aged 37–73 years’.

The study found that “High coffee consumption was associated with smaller total brain volumes and increased odds of dementia”.

In particular, consumption of >6 cups/day was associated with 53% higher odds of dementia compared to consumption of 1–2 cups/day.

A word of caution applies to all ‘food and disease’ association reports. Almost every week there are newspaper reports of studies exploring associations between “various food/drink” with “various diseases”. Some of them are conflicting and confusing with a positive study followed by a negative study !

This study report is no different in that respect.

A previous review published in 2017 concluded that ‘Drinking Coffee was often associated with Health benefits than harm for a range of health outcomes’.

The 2017 review in particular concluded that ‘Coffee consumption reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease’.

So how to make sense of these two conflicting study reports ?

A 2021 negative report versus a 2017 positive report.

One can look for quality of studies, pedigree of authors and further confirmatory studies .

But there are no easy answers.

Everything in moderation is perhaps the most sensible thing when it comes to Food and Drink.

References

High coffee consumption, brain volume and risk of dementia and stroke. Nutritional Neuroscience.
An International Journal on Nutrition, Diet and Nervous System. Published online: 24 Jun 2021
https://doi.org/10.1080/1028415X.2021.1945858

BMJ Minerva.
Calcification in arteries . . . and other stories
BMJ 2021; 374 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.n1901 (Published 05 August 2021)
Cite this as: BMJ 2021;374:n1901

BMJ. Coffee consumption and health: umbrella review of meta-analyses of multiple health outcomes
BMJ 2017; 359 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.j5024 (Published 22 November 2017)
Cite this as: BMJ 2017;359:j5024

Disclaimer: Please note – This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is NOT a expert medical opinion on various topics. This blog is purely for information only and do check the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you. The views expressed in this blog are NOT, in way whatsoever, intended to be a substitute for professional advice. The blog is NOT previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed, in any way, by any organisation that the author is associated with. The views expressed in this blog likely represents some of the author’s personal views held at the time of drafting the blog and MAY CHANGE overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light.

Do poor sleepers die early ?

Yes !

If someone feels they are not having regular refreshing sleep, then it is bad news.

In a very large U.K. study, involving 487,728 people, the following question was asked: Do you have trouble falling asleep at night or do you wake up in the middle of the night?

About a quarter of people in study answered “never/rarely”; just under half answered “sometimes” and less than one-third reported “usually”.

The people in study were followed up for many years (mean follow-up time = 8.9 years)

The people who reported frequent sleep disturbances (“usually” category) were found to be at risk of dying early.

The risk was highest in those with both diabetes and frequent sleep disturbances.

It needs to be seen whether the sleep disturbance by itself led to early death or whether people who are going to die early have medical problems that cause them to have disturbed sleep !

Sleep well. Don’t compromise sleep time !

References

Associations between sleep disturbances, diabetes and mortality in the UK Biobank cohort: A prospective population-based study
Malcolm von Schantz, Jason C. Ong, Kristen L. Knutson
First published: 08 June 2021
https://doi.org/10.1111/jsr.13392

( UK Biobank study participants experiencing sleep disturbances: 24.2% “never/rarely” ; 47.8% “sometimes” and 28.0% “usually”)

BMJ Minerva. Cognitive decline . . . and other stories. BMJ 2021; 373 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.n1545 (Published 24 June 2021)
Cite this as: BMJ 2021;373:n1545

People who have trouble sleeping are at a higher risk of dying early – especially diabetics

NHS. Why lack of sleep is bad for your health

Disclaimer: Please note- This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is NOT a expert medical opinion on various topics. This blog is purely for information only and do check the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you. The views expressed in this blog represent the author’s views held at the time of drafting the blog and may change overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light. The blog is not previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any organisation that the author is associated with. The views expressed in this blog are not, in way whatsoever, intended to be a substitute for professional advice.