Can “depression” cause heart problems and diabetes?

Sadly Yes !

A UK Biobank study analysed more than 325,000 individuals of European ancestry. The study found that people with low mood are at higher risk of developing heart and blood sugar problems. [ medical terms- coronary artery disease (CAD), type 2 diabetes (T2D) and atrial fibrillation].

Individuals with depression in this study were more likely to be current smokers; reported less vegetable and fresh fruit intake, less exercise and sleep; and had higher body weight (body mass index – BMI).

Even though the study adjusted the statistics for various baseline factors, one cannot help wonder whether there are yet unidentified factors at play.

References: Low depression frequency is associated with decreased risk of cardiometabolic disease. Michael C. Honigberg, Yixuan Ye, Lillian Dattilo, Amy A. Sarma, Nandita S. Scott, Jordan W. Smoller, Hongyu Zhao, Malissa J. Wood & Pradeep Natarajan.
Nature Cardiovascular Research (2022). Published: 14 February 2022

Daily Mail. Depression may increase the risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes, major study warns. By Emily Craig Health Reporter For Mailonline16:00, 14 Feb 2022 , updated 16:34, 14 Feb 2022

Disclaimer: Please note – This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is NOT a expert medical opinion on various topics. This blog is purely for information only and do check the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you. The views expressed in this blog are NOT, in any way whatsoever, intended to be a substitute for professional advice. The blog is NOT previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed, in any way, by any organisation that the author is associated with. The views expressed in this blog likely represents some of the author’s personal views held at the time of drafting the blog and MAY CHANGE overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light.

Low mood: Anti-depressants should not be the first choice for everyone

We live in a society where we look for quick fixes for everything.

For example, Fast-foods are immensely popular because we are all busy and we want quick fixes.

So it is not surprising that some people look at prescription medications as a quick fix for their low mood.

For some people, anti-depressants can be very helpful.

But a recent article suggests that anti-depressants should not be the first choice for everyone

Telegraph. Antidepressants might be largely ineffective, study suggests
By
Telegraph Reporters
21 December 2021 • 8:27am

Disclaimer: Please note – This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is NOT a expert medical opinion on various topics. This blog is purely for information only and do check the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you. The views expressed in this blog are NOT, in way whatsoever, intended to be a substitute for professional advice. The blog is NOT previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed, in any way, by any organisation that the author is associated with. The views expressed in this blog likely represents some of the author’s personal views held at the time of drafting the blog and MAY CHANGE overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light.

Anxiety and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

IBS or Irritable bowel syndrome is a common condition. Lot of people with IBS also have Anxiety problems.

So it was not known whether anxiety by itself causes the IBS.

A recent study suggests Anxiety and IBS coexist due to genetic abnormalities. Anxiety by itself does not seem to lead to someone developing IBS.

This large U.K. study involving 53,400 cases and 433,201 controls suggests that genes that alter brain–gut interactions may be responsible for IBS.

On the other hand, the overall likelihood of an individual developing IBS due to genes passed down the family seems low.

So with IBS, lot of things about it continue to remain a mystery. How IBS starts and how it progresses is still mostly unknown. Hopefully, future research will clarify things.

BBC News. Anxiety link to irritable bowel syndrome seen in DNA – research
By Michelle Roberts
Health editor, BBC News online

University of Cambridge. Large-scale genetic study reveals new clues for the shared origins of irritable bowel syndrome and mental health disorders

Eijsbouts, C et al. Genome-wide analysis of 53,400 people with irritable bowel syndrome highlights shared genetic pathways with mood and anxiety disorders. Nature Genetics; 5 Nov 2021; DOI: 10.1038/s41588-021-00950-8

Disclaimer: Please note – This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is NOT a expert medical opinion on various topics. This blog is purely for information only and do check the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you. The views expressed in this blog are NOT, in way whatsoever, intended to be a substitute for professional advice. The blog is NOT previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed, in any way, by any organisation that the author is associated with. The views expressed in this blog likely represents some of the author’s personal views held at the time of drafting the blog and MAY CHANGE overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light.