Does breast feeding the baby protect the mother from heart diseases in later life ?

Yes, it can.

A Study published in British Medical Journal found that “A longer length of breastfeeding was associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease”

The study also found that women who had certain pregnancy related complications were also at increased risk of heart disease in later life.

In addition, the study also found that taking contraceptive pills (combined pills) in younger age led to increased risk of heart disease and stroke in later life.

Awareness of these risks would help to take steps to reduce the risk from them.

References

Association between the reproductive health of young women and cardiovascular disease in later life: umbrella review. BMJ 2020; 371 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m3502 (Published 07 October 2020). Cite this as: BMJ 2020;371:m3502. https://www.bmj.com/content/371/bmj.m3502

Disclaimer: Please note- This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is purely for information only and do check the the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you.

The views expressed in this blog represent the author’s views held at the time of drafting the blog and may change overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light. The blog is not necessarily endorsed by any organisation the author is associated with and the authors views are not in way intended to be a substitute for professional advice.

Are breakfast cereals bad for your heart?

Yes.

A large study in BMJ reports that high intake of cereals is associated with higher risk of Blood pressure and Heart diseases.

High intake of white bread, pasta/noodles were also as bad as breakfast cereals because of the refined grains.

Intake of whole grains and whole grain porridges. did not affect the health outcomes.

Interestingly, white rice did not affect the health outcomes either.

Associations of cereal grains intake with cardiovascular disease and mortality across 21 countries in Prospective Urban and Rural Epidemiology study: prospective cohort study
BMJ 2021; 372 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m4948 (Published 03 February 2021)
Cite this as: BMJ 2021;372:m4948

Disclaimer: Please note- This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is NOT a expert medical opinion on various topics. This blog is purely for information only and do check the the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you.

The views expressed in this blog represent the author’s views held at the time of drafting the blog and may change overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light. The blog is not previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any organisation the author is associated with. The authors views are not in way intended to be a substitute for professional advice.

Is red meat bad for heart?

Yes, red meat can increase the risk of developing heart disease.

A large study involving more than 43,000 men conducted at USA shows that “Red meat increased the risk of developing heart disease “.

In contrast , plant proteins such as nuts and lentils reduced the risk of developing heart disease.

References: Red meat intake and risk of coronary heart disease among US men: prospective cohort study.
BMJ 2020; 371 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m4141 (Published 02 December 2020)
Cite this as: BMJ 2020;371:m4141

Disclaimer: Please note- This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is purely for information only and do check the the sources where cited. Please consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you.
The views expressed in this blog represent the author’s views held at the time of drafting the blog and is likely to change overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light. The blog is not necessarily endorsed by any organisation the author is associated with and views are not substitute for professional advice.