Does Drinking Coffee reduce the risk of getting prostate cancer ?

Yes

A study in the BMJ open journal reports that “Higher coffee consumption was significantly associated with a lower risk of prostate cancer”

The authors further report that “the risk of prostate cancer was reduced by nearly 1% for each extra one cup of coffee per day”

But a word of caution!

Almost every week there are newspaper reports of studies exploring associations between “various food/drink” with “various cancers/diseases” and some of them conflicting and confusing.

So conclusions of most individual studies relating to food and drink need to be taken with a dose of healthy scepticism.

Telegraph: Advanced prostate cancer sufferers less likely to die if they are heavy coffee drinkers, study finds
A single cup can reduce the chances of contracting the disease by as much as one per cent, researchers claim.

Chen X, Zhao Y, Tao Z, et al. Coffee consumption and risk of prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis BMJ Open 2021;11:e038902. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2020-038902

Jacobsen BK , Bjelke E , Kvåle G , et al . Coffee drinking, mortality, and cancer incidence: results from a Norwegian prospective study. J Natl Cancer Inst 1986;76:823–31.pmid:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3457969

Nomura A , Heilbrun LK , Stemmermann GN . Prospective study of coffee consumption and the risk of cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst 1986;76:587–90.doi:10.1093/jnci/76.4.587 pmid:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3457196

Disclaimer: Please note- This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is NOT a expert medical opinion on various topics. This blog is purely for information only and do check the the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you.

The views expressed in this blog represent the author’s views held at the time of drafting the blog and may change overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light. The blog is not necessarily endorsed by any organisation the author is associated with and the authors views are not in way intended to be a substitute for professional advice.

Cereals and Sausages, Chips and Candies, increase risk of Inflammatory bowel disease.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), is life long bowel disease. It consists of two types of diseases. One is called Crohn’s disease and another is called ulcerative colitis.

Crohn’s disease is a type of bowel disease which causes inflammation of the whole digestive tract from mouth to the end of back passage.

Ulcerative Colitis is a bowel disease which causes inflammation of the large bowel and back passage only.

What exactly causes Crohn’s disease or Ulcerative colitis is not fully understood.

A recent study in BMJ reports that high intake of ultra-processed increases risk of inflammatory bowel disease.

Ultra-processed food means processed meat, cold breakfast cereal, various types of sauce, soft drinks, refined sweetened foods (eg, candy, chocolate, jam, jelly, brownies, pudding), chips, ice cream, commercially prepared pastries, biscuits, fruit drinks, sweetened foods and soft drinks.

References

Association of ultra-processed food intake with risk of inflammatory bowel disease: prospective cohort study
BMJ 2021; 374 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.n1554 (Published 15 July 2021)
Cite this as: BMJ 2021;374:n1554

Disclaimer: Please note- This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is NOT a expert medical opinion on various topics. This blog is purely for information only and do check the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you. The views expressed in this blog represent the author’s personal views held at the time of drafting the blog and may change overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light. The blog is NOT previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any organisation that the author is associated with. The views expressed in this blog are NOT, in way whatsoever, intended to be a substitute for professional advice.

Can someone who had both COVID vaccines still die from COVID-19?

Yes, even after having both the vaccines, there is still a small risk of dying from COVID-19

Why?

This is because the vaccines are not 100% effective.

People who had both the vaccines can still get COVID-19 infection. A unlucky few of those who get an infection can still die from COVID-19.

Recent reports indicate that about half of deaths in U.K. are in people who had at least one dose of COVID vaccine.

The good thing is that the overall number of deaths is VERY LOW compared to the high number of deaths at the peak of pandemic when vaccines were not available.

Vast majority of infections do still occur in the unvaccinated individuals. ( PHE document- page 13 & 14)

The Guardian newspaper has got a good article on this topic.

One has to hope that vaccines do NOT lose their effectiveness over time.

We have to hope that more new variants do NOT emerge as there is a possibility that Vaccines may be less effective against new variants emerging in future.

References

Guardian.
Why most people who now die with Covid in England have been vaccinated
David Spiegelhalter and Anthony Masters
Sun 27 Jun 2021 08.00 BST

Daily Mail. Are these the numbers scaring Boris? Study shows 29% of the 42 people who have died after catching the new strain had BOTH vaccinations as cases soar another 40%. By James Robinson for MailOnline
14:08, 13 Jun 2021 , updated 12:22, 14 Jun 2021

Public Health England. Research and analysis
Investigation of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern: technical briefings.
Technical briefing documents on novel SARS-CoV-2 variants.

Last updated 25 June 2021. (page 13 and 14)

Disclaimer: Please note- This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is NOT a expert medical opinion on various topics. This blog is purely for information only and do check the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you. The views expressed in this blog represent the author’s views held at the time of drafting the blog and may change overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light. The blog is not previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any organisation that the author is associated with. The views expressed in this blog are not, in way whatsoever, intended to be a substitute for professional advice.

Can unauthorised treatments cause harm?

Yes, there is a risk of serious harm from “unauthorised” COVID treatments that are not officially authorised by competent regulatory authorities such as MHRA in UK or FDA in USA.

If a treatment is not authorised, it should have at least have good clinical trial evidence.

India is going to a rough patch. People with COVID are desperate for treatment. There is shortage of oxygen which is a commonly used treatment.

Apart from oxygen for respiratory support, only Two treatments have been proven to be of significant help in COVID-19 pneumonia. (1) Steroids (2) An arthritis drug called Tocilizumab

Many antivirals drugs have not shown any meaningful benefit. Various other drugs are still in trials.

It is rapidly evolving area and the BMJ has a COVID guideline which is being frequently updated during this pandemic.

This is significant risk of harm from drugs which are NOT properly assessed in clinical trials.

Anecdotally there has been lot of sudden deaths in India. Lot of unproven treatments such as Azithromycin, ivermectin, antivirals agents, chloroquine, and other agents widely used in india.

Although there is no definitive proof, One cannot help wondering whether poor outcome in at least some Indian patients is related to combinations of unproven drugs that are used widely in unregulated private healthcare sector.

BMJ. Drug treatments for covid-19: living systematic review and network meta-analysis
BMJ 2020; 370 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m2980 (Published 30 July 2020)
Cite this as: BMJ 2020;370:m2980

BMJ. A living WHO guideline on drugs for covid-19 BMJ 2020; 370 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m3379 (Published 04 September 2020).

BMJ COVID-19 Treatment algorithm.

Disclaimer: Please note- This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is NOT a expert medical opinion on various topics. This blog is purely for information only and do check the the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you. The views expressed in this blog represent the author’s views held at the time of drafting the blog and may change overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light. The blog is not previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any organisation the author is associated with. The views expressed in this blog are not in way intended to be a substitute for professional advice.

Can you get COVID-19 infection just by “Talking” to an infected person for a few minutes?

Yes, you can.

You don’t need to be exposed to an infected person who is coughing, sneezing and spluttering to get the infection.

Merely talking to an infected person can make you catch the coronavirus infection particularly if you are very close to the person with infection and not wearing a mask in an indoor setting with poor ventilation.

Remember, Even Vaccines don’t have 100% protection.

Remember to maintain Space and Wear a Face Mask

References

Guardian. Talking can spread Covid as much as coughing, says research.
Tiny aerosols of the virus emitted when speaking linger in air for longer than larger droplets from a cough.
Nicola Davis Science correspondent
@NicolaKSDavis
Wed 20 Jan 2021 00.01 GMT

Journal Proceedings of the Royal Society A. Evolution of spray and aerosol from respiratory releases: theoretical estimates for insight on viral transmission. P. M. de Oliveira , L. C. C. Mesquita , S. Gkantonas , A. Giusti and E. Mastorakos. Published:20 January 2021. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspa.2020.0584

Guardian. Single Covid vaccine dose in Israel ‘less effective than we thought’.
Peter Beaumont
Tue 19 Jan 2021 16.53 GMT

Telegraph: UK to ‘look carefully’ at claims vaccine efficacy in Israel has dropped to 33 per cent with one dose.
Israel’s vaccine tsar says single Pfizer dose appears ‘less effective than we had thought’ as scientists demand evidence is published
By
Sarah Knapton,
SCIENCE EDITOR
20 January 2021 • 1:46pm

Daily Mail: Israel is STILL waiting for its world-beating vaccination drive to kick in as cases and hospitalisations soar higher than ever despite vaccine stopping 50% of new Covid infections. By Chris Jewers For Mailonline11:20, 14 Jan 2021 , updated 18:04, 14 Jan 2021

Disclaimer: Please note- This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is NOT a expert medical opinion on various topics. This blog is purely for information only and do check the the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you.

The views expressed in this blog represent the author’s views held at the time of drafting the blog and may change overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light. The blog is not necessarily endorsed by any organisation the author is associated with and the authors views are not in way intended to be a substitute for professional advice.

Covid-19: Can you catch the coronavirus while exercising outdoors?

Yes, you can.

But the risk depends on how long and how close you have been in touch with an infected person.

Momentarily passing someone while jogging is extremely unlikely to lead to an infection.

But face to face contact lasting many minutes with a friend or someone who is infected can lead to an infection.

There is a good article on how BBC website.

References:

BBC. Covid-19: Can you catch the virus outside?https://www.bbc.com/news/explainers-55680305
By David Shukman. Science editor.

Mayo Clinic. Safe outdoor activities during the COVID-19 pandemic. By Mayo Clinic Staff.

Imperial. Airborne transmission of COVID-19 carrier particles during exercise.

UK. Ministry of Housing, Communities &
Local Government. Guidance. COVID-19: Guidance for managing playgrounds and outdoor gyms. Updated 6 January 2021

Disclaimer: Please note- This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is NOT a expert medical opinion on various topics. This blog is purely for information only and do check the the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you.

The views expressed in this blog represent the author’s views held at the time of drafting the blog and may change overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light. The blog is not necessarily endorsed by any organisation the author is associated with and the authors views are not in way intended to be a substitute for professional advice.