Does taking omega 3 fatty acids from plants improve health ?

Yes.

“Alpha linolenic acid (ALA) and linoleic acid is a essential polyunsaturated fatty acids commonly extracted from plants”

These fatty acids are found in “soybean, nuts, canola oils, flaxseed, and other plant foods”.

A recent study published in BMJ shows that these dietary fatty acids are good for overall health and reduces risk of death. The study found benefits in terms of reducing strokes and heart problems but paradoxically these fatty acids slightly increased the risk of death from cancer .

A word of caution applies to all ‘food and disease’ association reports. Almost every week there are reports of studies exploring associations between “various food/drink” with “various diseases”. Some of them are conflicting and sometimes confusing with a positive study followed by a negative study. So take all food related studies with a pinch of salt !

Reference: Dietary intake and biomarkers of alpha linolenic acid and risk of all cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality: systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of cohort studies
BMJ 2021; 375 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.n2213 (Published 14 October 2021)
Cite this as: BMJ 2021;375:n2213

Disclaimer: Please note – This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is NOT a expert medical opinion on various topics. This blog is purely for information only and do check the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you. The views expressed in this blog are NOT, in way whatsoever, intended to be a substitute for professional advice. The blog is NOT previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed, in any way, by any organisation that the author is associated with. The views expressed in this blog likely represents some of the author’s personal views held at the time of drafting the blog and MAY CHANGE overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light.

What time of the day should you take your blood pressure medication: morning or evening?

It is a common question for many people. When should the blood pressure medications be taken?

High blood is quite common in the General population. High blood pressure can cause blood vessel damage, heart problems and brain damage.

First of all , Taking medication regularly, at any time of the day, is more important than forgetting to take the medication every day.

If one does take the blood pressure medication regularly, then taking it at evening seems to be more beneficial than taking the medication in the morning.

A Japanese study assessed blood pressure of patients continuously at home. All patients in the study underwent 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring at baseline. Patients were then followed every year to determine the rate of heart and blood vessel complications .

The Japanese study found that high nightime blood pressure readings were an important sign of future heart problems.

A review by the renowned Cochrane group found that “better blood pressure control was achieved with bedtime dosing than morning administration of blood pressure (antihypertensive) medication”

So if possible taking the blood pressure medication at bedtime makes sense .

References:

(1) Nighttime Blood Pressure Phenotype and Cardiovascular Prognosis. Practitioner-Based Nationwide JAMP Study. Kazuomi Kario, et al. On behalf of the JAMP Study Group.
Originally published2 Nov 2020. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.120.049730Circulation. 2020;142:1810–1820

(2). Zhao P, Xu P, Wan C, Wang Z. Evening versus morning dosing regimen drug therapy for hypertension. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD004184. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004184.pub2

Disclaimer: Please note- This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is purely for information only and do check the the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you.

The views expressed in this blog represent the author’s views held at the time of drafting the blog and may change overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light. The blog is not necessarily endorsed by any organisation the author is associated with and views are not substitute for professional advice.

Do poor sleepers die early ?

Yes !

If someone feels they are not having regular refreshing sleep, then it is bad news.

In a very large U.K. study, involving 487,728 people, the following question was asked: Do you have trouble falling asleep at night or do you wake up in the middle of the night?

About a quarter of people in study answered “never/rarely”; just under half answered “sometimes” and less than one-third reported “usually”.

The people in study were followed up for many years (mean follow-up time = 8.9 years)

The people who reported frequent sleep disturbances (“usually” category) were found to be at risk of dying early.

The risk was highest in those with both diabetes and frequent sleep disturbances.

It needs to be seen whether the sleep disturbance by itself led to early death or whether people who are going to die early have medical problems that cause them to have disturbed sleep !

Sleep well. Don’t compromise sleep time !

References

Associations between sleep disturbances, diabetes and mortality in the UK Biobank cohort: A prospective population-based study
Malcolm von Schantz, Jason C. Ong, Kristen L. Knutson
First published: 08 June 2021
https://doi.org/10.1111/jsr.13392

( UK Biobank study participants experiencing sleep disturbances: 24.2% “never/rarely” ; 47.8% “sometimes” and 28.0% “usually”)

BMJ Minerva. Cognitive decline . . . and other stories. BMJ 2021; 373 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.n1545 (Published 24 June 2021)
Cite this as: BMJ 2021;373:n1545

People who have trouble sleeping are at a higher risk of dying early – especially diabetics

NHS. Why lack of sleep is bad for your health

Disclaimer: Please note- This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is NOT a expert medical opinion on various topics. This blog is purely for information only and do check the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you. The views expressed in this blog represent the author’s views held at the time of drafting the blog and may change overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light. The blog is not previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any organisation that the author is associated with. The views expressed in this blog are not, in way whatsoever, intended to be a substitute for professional advice.

Does breast feeding the baby protect the mother from heart diseases in later life ?

Yes, it can.

A Study published in British Medical Journal found that “A longer length of breastfeeding was associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease”

The study also found that women who had certain pregnancy related complications were also at increased risk of heart disease in later life.

In addition, the study also found that taking contraceptive pills (combined pills) in younger age led to increased risk of heart disease and stroke in later life.

Awareness of these risks would help to take steps to reduce the risk from them.

References

Association between the reproductive health of young women and cardiovascular disease in later life: umbrella review. BMJ 2020; 371 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m3502 (Published 07 October 2020). Cite this as: BMJ 2020;371:m3502. https://www.bmj.com/content/371/bmj.m3502

Disclaimer: Please note- This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is purely for information only and do check the the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you.

The views expressed in this blog represent the author’s views held at the time of drafting the blog and may change overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light. The blog is not necessarily endorsed by any organisation the author is associated with and the authors views are not in way intended to be a substitute for professional advice.