Should Heath care workers be compelled to have the COVID vaccine ?

The health care workers often deal with the people who are most vulnerable to COVID.

Studies have shown that hospital transmission of COVID played a significant role during first and subsequent wave of the pandemic.

So healthcare workers have a moral and ethical duty to protect their patients by vaccinating themselves.

But this needs to be balanced against the personal choices and beliefs of the healthcare worker.

It is possible that Hospitals and Care homes would make vaccination mandatory for healthcare staff in the near future.

References

Guardian. Healthcare professionals in the UK have a moral duty to get the Covid jab
Frances Ryan.

Daily Mail on Line. Nearly 80% of health care workers in Illinois and half of staff in Texas and North Carolina REFUSE coronavirus vaccines – and it’s holding up the rollout of shots across the US. By Associated Press and Natalie Rahhal U.S. Health Editor 15:37, 08 Jan 2021 , updated 21:21, 08 Jan 2021

Daily Mail. NHS staff could be forced to have Covid jab: Radical plan is being considered for thousands of medical staff who turn down the vaccine… but what if they STILL refuse? By Jason Groves Political Editor For The Daily Mail
22:14, 02 Mar 2021 , updated 22:52, 02 Mar 2021

Gov.UK. SARS-CoV-2 in the hospital environment and risk of COVID-19 nosocomial transmission, 31 May 2020. Paper prepared by the Environmental and Modelling Group (EMG). From:
Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies
Published: 26 June 2020

Guardian. Fifth of patients with Covid-19 may have caught it in hospital, study finds
This article is more than 9 months old
PHE research chimes with concerns that asymptomatic healthcare workers may have played role in spread Coronavirus

Nicola Davis
@NicolaKSDavis
Tue 19 May 2020 18.56 BST

Disclaimer: Please note- This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is NOT a expert medical opinion on various topics. This blog is purely for information only and do check the the sources where cited. Please DO consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you.

The views expressed in this blog represent the author’s views held at the time of drafting the blog and may change overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light. The blog is not previewed, commissioned or otherwise endorsed by any organisation the author is associated with. The authors views are not in way intended to be a substitute for professional advice.

Are families of Healthcare workers at increased risk of hospital admission due to COVID-19 ?

Yes !

“Patient Facing” healthcare workers do admirably put them at harms way during this Coronavirus pandemic .

So health workers are at increased risk of getting admitted to hospital due to COVID-19.

But a recent Paper in BMJ says that families of healthcare workers are also at increased risk of hospital admission. In very few other lines of work, does the occupational hazard affect the families of workers as well.

The authors report “ …. patient facing healthcare workers and members of their households were, respectively, threefold and twofold more likely to be admitted to hospital. Healthcare workers and their households accounted for one in six of all admissions with covid-19 in the working age population (18-65 years).”

The paper says “Among admitted healthcare workers, one in eight were admitted into critical care and six (2.5%) died; in admitted household members, one in five were admitted to critical care and 18 (12.9%) died.”

Routine testing of healthcare workers and early testing of families as well as better access to effective PPE is urgently needed.

References : 1. Risk of hospital admission with coronavirus disease 2019 in healthcare workers and their households: nationwide linkage cohort study. BMJ 2020; 371 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m3582 (Published 28 October 2020)Cite this as: BMJ 2020;371:m3582

2. Covid-19: risks to healthcare workers and their families. BMJ 2020; 371 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m3944 (Published 28 October 2020)Cite this as: BMJ 2020;371:m3944

Disclaimer: Please note- This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is purely for information only and do check the the sources where cited. Please consult your own doctor to discuss concerns and options relevant to you.

The views expressed in this blog represent the author’s views held at the time of drafting the blog and is likely to change overtime, particularly when new evidence comes to light. The blog is not necessarily endorsed by any organisation the author is associated with and views are not substitute for professional advice.